Canon PowerShot G9/G10/G11 Neutral Density Filter

Canon PowerShot G10I’ve recently received several email messages asking how to enable and correctly use the neutral density filter built into the Canon PowerShot G9, G10 and G11 cameras recently.

Here are a few tips & tricks to get you started. Enabling the built in 3-stop ND filter is very simple:

  1. Press the Function/Set button to get to the Function menu.
  2. Use the Up arrow or Down arrow to highlight the ND icon.
  3. Use the Right or Left arrow to select ND (ND Filter On).
  4. Press the Function/Set button again to exit the menu.

If you plan to use the ND filter often you can assign it to the little “S” (shortcut) button using the Set Shortcut Button menu.

Other Tips & Tricks

  • Use a tripod to eliminate camera shake when using the built in ND filter. Read my previous post for more details.
  • You can use a Canon RS60-E3 remote cable release with the PowerShot G10 / G11 or use the Self-Timer to activate the shutter and eliminate even more camera shake.
  • Use a circular polarizer to eliminate reflections and add color depth to you images. My previous post explains how to “trick out” your G9/G10/G11 for landscape shooting.

The River Flows

The River Flows – Spring Branch, Texas
Copyright © 2009 Jeff Lynch Photography
Shot taken with a Canon Powershot G10 set on full manual mode and tripod-mounted. The exposure was taken at 30mm, f/8 for 0.6 seconds using the built-in neutral density filter at ISO 80. Post capture processing was done in Adobe’s Lightroom 3 Beta. Click on the image above for a larger version.

Running Water Shot with Canon’s G10

Here’s another abstract landscape shot with Canon’s Powershot G10 using its built-in 3-stop neutral density filter. Landscape photographers have long known the creative potential a neutral density filter can offer when shooting flowing water using a long exposure. Being able to take advantage of this in a point & shoot camera is somewhat unique and really sets the Canon G9, G10 & G11 apart from the competition.

Swirl - Guadalupe River, Texas

Swirl – Guadalupe River State Park, Texas
Copyright © 2009 Jeff Lynch Photography
Shot taken with a Canon Powershot G10 set on aperture priority (Av) and tripod-mounted. The exposure was taken at 30mm, f/8 for 1/2 second using the built-in neutral density filter at ISO 80 on Lexar Professional digital film. Post capture processing was done in Adobe’s Lightroom 2. Click on the image above for a larger version.

Canon 40D Reflection

If you look at your images closely enough, you’re bound to find something interesting! Probably the most unusual landscape shot I’ve ever presented.

reflection_blog

Canon 40D Reflections
Copyright © 2008 Jeff Lynch Photography
Shot taken with a Canon Powershot G9 hand-held at 7mm, f/3.5 for 1/100th of a second at ISO 200 on SanDisk digital film. All post capture processing was done in Lightroom 2 and Noise Ninja.

It’s the Little Things That Count

In landscape photography sometimes it’s the little things that count the most. One of the most important aspects of creating a well composed landscape image is knowing where “level” is. This is especially true when your background is hilly or mountainous. We use our sense of “level” so much every day that a person will look at an image on the web or in print and instinctively know if it’s not perfectly level. However, finding that perfect “level” in a camera’s viewfinder is not so simple, especially as we get older.

Luckily, the folks at Bogen / Manfrotto sell a great little Hot Shoe Bubble Level 337 that takes all the guesswork out of finding a perfect “level” in our landscape images. For about $35.00 (USD) it’s a great little Holiday gift too.

bubble_level_blog

Hot Shoe Bubble Level
Copyright © 2008 Jeff Lynch Photography
Shots taken with a Canon Powershot G9 hand-held at 30mm, f/4.0 for 1/320th of a second at ISO 200 on SanDisk digital film. All post capture processing was done in Lightroom 2 and Noise Ninja.