Grace & Beauty

I hope when I’m eighty I have half the grace and poise that this wonderful model does. Her song enchanted me and I had to capture the life, love and beauty of this incredible face. It’s one of my favorite portraits.

Grace & Beauty

Grace – Fayetteville, Texas
Copyright © 2010 Jeff Lynch Photography
Shot taken with a Canon EOS 5D Mark II set on aperture priority (Av) using an EF 70-200mm f/4L IS USM lens hand-held. The exposure was taken at 200mm, f/6.3 for 1/250th of a second at ISO 800 using a Singh-Ray warming circular polarizer. All post capture processing was done in Adobe’s Lightroom 3.
Click on the image above for a larger version.

On a personal note
My sincere thanks to everyone for your prayers and concerns for my daughter Margaret. She is beginning to feel better and her doctors are very positive. Next week when we get the test results we will know better if this is just a bump in the road or not. — Jeff

Develop Your Photographic Diversity

When times are good and the economy is rolling along, it’s all too easy to become a niche photographer and specialize in work that you are most familiar and comfortable with. I know several local photographers that do only event photography like weddings and bar mitzvahs and others that do only high school senior portraits. Many landscape and nature photographers that I know wouldn’t think of shooting a wedding or sweet-sixteen party, let alone a corporate head-shot. When times are good . . .

Well, right now times aren’t so good and many photographers find themselves scratching to make a living, lowering prices and accepting client terms they would have laughed at several years ago. It doesn’t look like the economy is going to recover anytime soon and even if it does, the market for commercial photography may never be what it once was. Corporate and personal frugality may become the norm rather than the exception.

But some photographers are thriving despite their circumstances. These folks seem to understand that “specialization is for insects, not people” (Yes, you’ve heard me say this before). They know that there is incredible strength in photographic diversity.

It’s a lesson that every photographer should heed, myself included. Mix things up a little and photograph subjects that stretch your current skills. If you shoot predominately landscapes and nature, go out and shoot some portraits. Dig a little deeper and reach a little further. If you shoot wedding and events, get up early one morning and shoot the sunrise. Get out of your photographic comfort zone and take creative some risk.

I think Dewitt Jones sums it up nicely. “Celebrate What’s Right With the World”.

What have you got to lose?

Race Gun

Race Gun – Sugar Land, Texas
Copyright © 2011 Jeff Lynch Photography
Shot taken with a Canon EOS 5D Mark II set on aperture (Av) priority using an EF 24-105mm f/4L IS USM lens tripod mounted. The exposure was taken at 35mm, f/9 for 1/400th of a second at ISO 100 using a Singh-Ray warming polarizer filter. Post capture processing was done in Adobe’s Lightroom 3 and Photoshop CS5.
Click on the image above for a larger version.

Simple Beauty

Simple Beauty – Austin, Texas
Copyright © 2010 Jeff Lynch Photography
Shot taken with a Canon EOS 5D Mark II set on manual (M) using an EF 24-105mm f/4L IS USM lens hand-held. Lit with a Profoto strobe and shoot-through umbrella for fill flash. The exposure was taken at 102mm, f/7.1 for 1/200th of a second at ISO 100. Post capture processing was done in Adobe’s Lightroom 3 and Photoshop CS5.
Click on the image above for a larger version.

Wet

Wet – Brazos Bend State Park, Texas
Copyright © 2011 Jeff Lynch Photography
Shot taken with a Canon EOS 7D set on aperture (Av) priority using an EF 400mm f/4 DO IS USM + EF 1.4x Extender hand-held. The exposure was taken at 560mm, f/7.1 for 1/200th of a second at ISO 100. Post capture processing was done in Adobe’s Lightroom 3.
Click on the image above for a larger version.

Old Dogs Learn New Tricks

They say you can’t teach an old dog new tricks but I think this old dog will hunt!

I spent most of last Saturday attending a portraiture workshop in Austin put on by well known commercial photographer, Kirk Tuck. Now I haven’t shot a portrait in nearly 20 years so it took a while for my rattled old brain to engage again and begin to remember those lessons I learned in the mid 70’s. Kirk’s teaching style was relaxed but organized as he ran us through the basics of a good two light headshot using different lighting modifiers like a diffusion panel, shoot through umbrella and a huge 6′ tall softbox.

Lena

Lena – Austin, Texas
Copyright © 2010 Jeff Lynch Photography
Shot taken with a Canon EOS 5D Mark II set on manual (M) using an EF 24-105mm f/4L IS USM lens hand-held using a Profoto strobe and 6′ soft-box. The exposure was taken at 100mm, f/5.6 for 1/200th of a second at ISO 100. Post capture processing was done in Adobe’s Lightroom 3 Beta and Photoshop CS4. Click on the image above for a larger version.

Next he brought in an incredibly talented makeup artist, Patrica de la Garza to teach us the finer points of why we really do need a good makeup artist for commercial headshots. Patricia did an incredible job with Lena (above) and her presentation really got me thinking.

Next Kirk brought in the renowned photojournalist and commercial photographer Will van Overbeek, to show us a completely different style of portrait work using nothing more than a single softbox and a seamless white background. Next Will demonstrated some very simple fill-flash techniques for environmental portraits done using a single speedlight.

Barbara

Barbara – Austin, Texas
Copyright © 2010 Jeff Lynch Photography
Shot taken with a Canon EOS 5D Mark II set on manual (M) using an EF 24-105mm f/4L IS USM lens hand-held using a Profoto strobe and shoot-through umbrella for fill flash. The exposure was taken at 102mm, f/7.1 for 1/200th of a second at ISO 100. Post capture processing was done in Adobe’s Lightroom 3 Beta and Photoshop CS4. Click on the image above for a larger version.

After the demonstrations it was time to put our newly acquired knowledge to the test. Honestly, I could have gotten a great shot of either Lena or Barbara using my old Argus C-4 (google it youngsters). Kirk, Will and Park Street had the lighting setup perfectly and all we had to do was “point & shoot” and not get in our own way. These two college kids (the Talent) were real troopers, standing patiently while we blasted them with enough photons from those Profoto strobes to cause mild sunburn.

It was a great workshop and a real nice change of pace for me personally. After teaching the Texas Landscape Safari for the past couple years it was nice just to sit back and enjoy a great refresher course in classic portraiture from some incredibly talented folks like Kirk, Patricia, Will and Park.

Kudos folks!